Land Heritage

Land Heritage was founded just after the Second World War by Somerset farmer Hugh Flatt who was increasingly struck by how disconnected people had become from the land and from food production.

London-based Together Design created this symbol to illustrate the charity’s love of the land.

It’s not in use today, unfortunately — Land Heritage merged with the Paget Estate and the Soil Association in 2007 to form the Land Trust.

Still, a memorable, fitting idea.

(via Logo Design Love)

Get Back, Tohoku’s Advertisements

Can you believe this is an actual photo, and not some CGI or painting?

This campaign isn’t just winning awards, it’s winning heart too. How can anyone not be attracted to these dream-like pictures that tug at our inner desire to explore and travel?

Since 2011 JR East, one of Japan’s major passenger railway groups, has been running a powerful advertising campaign called Get Back, Tohoku (行くぜ、東北). In an interview in 2015 Dentsu Director Yoshihiro Yagi, who has been spearheading the campaign, explained that the idea was conceived in the wake of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami because the best way to support the region was to get people to go there.

[…] “There must be something we can do,” Yagi recalls saying. This eventually led to the campaign slogan Get Back, Tohoku. The posters, now in their 7th year, have largely remained the same in concept and typically feature minimal but powerful photos of trains with the slogan in small, bold letters. At the bottom of the poster, in small font, it reads “You can’t meet by e-mail. Meet on the rails.”

Read more about it at Spoon & Tamago.

The Feeling Of Not Being Able To Write

This is a familiar feeling. I’ve walked this path before, many times.

A few weeks back, I set my mind to posting here regularly, again. Despite the lengthy layoff, I thought the return would be made smoother after 4 years of writing.

Man, how wrong and naive it was to habour that thought. I knew it’s not going to be easy, but I never imagined it would be this excruciatingly tough. It’s painful to turn an idea in my head into words on the screen. Often, the words appear to lose their meaning after I typed them. They are not what I wanted to communicate. On some occasions, the words dried up while I was typing. They almost never return.

I’ve shared my struggles with writing before but this feeling unlike anything in the past. It could be the constant sleep deprivation — a maximum of 5 hours of interrupted rest every week night. This, together with the pressure on the constant disappointment in my job search, may have led to my current awkward state. It seemed every thing, object and people were weighing me down. There was no margin to breathe.

I wrote this on the last page of a generic paper notebook. I was hoping it can offer me an escape from this writing slump and it certainly helped.

Now that I’ve got this out of my chest, let’s see where this newfound enthusiasm will lead me.

The Story Behind Brazil Iconic Football Jersey

Football and Brazil is intertwined. The samba skills, the nifty footwork, the joy of playing – these are the images we’ve come to associate Brazilian football with.

As a huge football fan, I’m a big admirer of the iconic jerseys of Brazil national team. I find them to be an accurate representation of its country – vibrant, diverse, energetic and fun-loving.

Though I’ve never own any of their shirts, it doesn’t stop me from casting an envy eye on the design. The story behind this bright yellow top with green trims, blue shorts and white socks involves a trip down memory lane to their World Cup struggle in 1950.

Brazil lost that game, and Brazilians were absolutely crushed. People left the stadium in tears, and some of their tears transformed into racist grudges.

[…] Everything was scrutinized, including those plain white jerseys the players had worn in the game. Brazilians thought they were cursed and the soccer authorities decided to hold a competition to design a new uniform.

Not to spoil anything here, read on to find out what happened next.

New Jersey by 99% Invisible

Magazine B

I love magazines. I adore the concepts behind good branding.

Combing these two interests bring Magazine B, a publication that explores in-depth on just one particular brand in each issue.

I’ve a few issues in my book shelves and they’re all lovely reads. The editors have good taste on the brands to cover – not the mainstream giants we are familiar with, but the more restrained brands like Aesop, MUJI and Patagonia.

“People want to know more about the brands around them. B aims to be a messenger to help readers discover what good brands are.”, Taehyuk Choi, editor-in-chief of the publication, responding to why this magazine exist.

A brand is an experience and a promise. Picking up Magazine B is both an enriching experience and a promise to discover what makes brand good.

Less

Less Fluff
Less Stuff
Less Clutter
Less Greed
Less Debt
Less Multitasking
Less Evil

The practice of having less is ever more important in today’s rapid-moving, consumerism culture.

We should be more mindful of our relationship with our possessions – what we already have and what we intend to get.

It starts with the mindset of enough.

Part of the joy is discovering you can do a lot more with the tools at your disposal than you thought was possible.

So there, let’s look for the simplest tool for our job. Seek to understand it – almost fully – before trying out a different tool.

Because having less can be beautiful too.

The Most Valuable Resource In The World Is Data, Not Oil

What is the fuel that powers the world?

It’s no longer oil.

It’s data.

In this digital-era of ours, we are surrounded by data. The ones that control these data have enormous power over us and the economy.

Our every movement online are being tracked, like a giant eye following us everywhere we go and documenting our behavior for analysis in the lab.

Google can see what people search for, Facebook what they share, Amazon what they buy. They own app stores and operating systems, and rent out computing power to startups. They have a “God’s eye view” of activities in their own markets and beyond. They can see when a new product or service gains traction, allowing them to copy it or simply buy the upstart before it becomes too great a threat.

[…] By providing barriers to entry and early-warning systems, data can stifle competition.

Read more at The Economist

On Collecting

Inspired by an article called The Collectors in Medium, where Daniel Stanoescu talked about how Internet have enabled everyone to be a collector of any subjects. The ease of collecting such items wasn’t available to us in the past.

Sometimes I wonder if the ease of collecting things make us less appreciative of their existence. Information used to be limited and scarce, available to the blessed minority fortunate enough to have them. Now, information are in abundance and every one can publish to the world. So much for information overload and the excessive amount of clutters we are subjected to every day.

When such occurrence takes place, there is a certain degree of helplessness in being overwhelmed by its sheer volume. There is always that lingering feeling of things to digest, articles to catch up, videos to watch. Consciously or not, it prompts us into action.

How We Grow Into Collectors

We feverishly become collector. Internet has become the library of the generation. Anything deemed useful will be shoved into the archive of our ever growing collection. We collect first, think second. Instead of asking ourselves whether we really need it, the general notion dictates that it might be useful one day. It typifies the obsessive nature of human behaviour – if we have the choice of having it all, we are going to have it all.

Collecting becomes a habit, and I have them in the followings:

I could have used Evernote to replace some of the services above. It’s a catch-all service for anything and everything. Like bookmarking, highlighting quotes, to-do list and others. It is precisely this reason I’m veering away from it. I want to draw a clear distinction between different collections.

When I go to Pinboard, for example, I know I’ll be referencing past articles for materials. For ideas and quick draft, I’d always fire up Simplenote. If I were to store all these in Evernote, I could be lost in there, probably distracted, and maybe overwhelmed by the mountain I’ve archived. I like products and services that’s focused on just one thing and doing it well. It presents minimal distraction.

When companies are so steadfast in their approach for excellence in one particular area, they rarely disappoint.